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Gadsden State Community College

History

Mission

Philosophy

Organizing Framework

Program Outcomes

 

History

 

Gadsden State Community College is a public, open-door comprehensive community college under the control of the Alabama State Board of Education.  The College initially became Gadsden State Community College on February 28, 1985, when the Alabama State Board of Education merged Alabama Technical College, Gadsden State Technical Institute, and Gadsden State Junior College. On February 27, 2003, the College was expanded by the consolidation of Harry M. Ayers State Technical College and Gadsden State Community College.

   

Gadsden State Technical Institute, the second oldest component of Gadsden State Community College, began operations in 1960 as Gadsden Vocational Trade School, a private training facility. In 1997, the U.S. Department of Education designated this institution as a “Historically Black College or University” (HBCU).  It is now identified as the Valley Street Campus of Gadsden State Community College.

 

1960 – a practical nursing program was initiated at the Gadsden Vocational Trade School (now Valley Street Campus)

 

1965 – the Harry M. Ayers State Trade School began a practical nursing program (as of January 2005, this program was relocated to the McClellan Center)

 

1967 – an associate degree registered nursing program was begun at Gadsden State Junior College (now Wallace Drive campus)

 

1985 – the LPN to RN Mobility Program was begun on the Wallace Drive Campus

 

2008 – with the opening of the newly constructed facility at the Cherokee Center, a practical nursing program was begun there.

 

2010 – the Paramedic to RN program was initiated on the Wallace Drive Campus

 

Together all three practical nursing programs, the registered nursing program , and the mobility programs (LPN – RN and Paramedic to RN) comprise the nursing education department of the Health Sciences Division.

 

 

Mission

The mission of the Registered Nursing program is to provide educational services that satisfy both the need in the College service area for registered nurses at the A.A.S. degree level and the desire of people who seek a relatively short-term career education program in nursing.  The College seeks to satisfy these needs by providing a State Board of Nursing approved and a Acceditation Commission for Education of Nurses (formerly National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission) accredited program.  The unit in nursing is dedicated to providing a program that incorporates the most current knowledge and technology in the preparation of nurses for independent, interdependent, and collaborative functions when providing goal-directed service to man as a health-care consumer.  The mission extends to include the provision of continuing education, professional development, and personal enrichment experiences for health-care practitioners and others in the community.

 

The mission of the Practical Nursing program is to provide educational services that satisfy both the need in the College service area for practical nurses at the certificate level and the desire of people who seek a relatively short-term career education program in nursing.  The College seeks to satisfy these needs by providing a State Board of Nursing and a Acceditation Commission for Education of Nurses (formerly National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission) accredited program.  The unit in nursing is dedicated to providing a program that incorporates the most current knowledge and technology in the preparation of nurses for independent, interdependent, and collaborative functions when providing goal-directed service to man as a health-care consumer.  The mission extends to include the provision of continuing nursing progression and education, professional development, and personal enrichment experiences for health-care practitioners and others in the community.

 

 

Philosophy

The philosophy of the nursing programs is consistent with the mission, goals and objectives of The Alabama College System.  The programs provide curricula to develop the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for entry level employment in practical and professional nursing.  The nursing faculty endorses the following beliefs:

 

Maslow’s theory is the foundation for the program of learning.  According to Maslow, all individuals have similar needs arranged in a hierarchy with higher needs emerging as basic physiological needs are met.  Individuals are unique biological, psychosocial and spiritual beings who strive to meet holistic needs.  Each individual has the right to make informed decisions about one’s health in a technologically changing society.  Society, a complex system that influences culture, values, and beliefs, provides direction and meaning to an individual’s experiences throughout the lifespan.

  

Health, which is individually perceived, exists when needs are met.  Ranging on a continuum from highest level wellness to death, health is a dynamic state.  The goals of health care are to promote, maintain, and restore health.

            

Nursing is an art, as well as a science, in which the holistic needs of the individual are met through utilization of the nursing process in a variety of settings.  The nursing process incorporates scientific principles, interpersonal and psychomotor skills.  The practice of nursing takes place in an ever changing health care system and requires caring, critical thinking, competency,  legal/ethical accountability, dedication to an evolving body of knowledge, life-long learning and client advocacy. 

 

The teaching-learning process is a shared responsibility between faculty and students where faculty serve as facilitators of learning. The successful teaching-learning process requires an environment that promotes learning, considers the needs of the individual, and provides opportunities for student participation and educational goal attainment.  The learning process is based on principles of critical thinking and is enhanced by the presentation of information from simple to complex.  Learning is achieved when there is evidence of a change in behavior within the cognitive, affective, and/or psychomotor domains. Individuals have the right to achieve self-actualization, and society provides educational opportunities.

 

 Nursing education is a learner-centered process which combines general education and nursing courses to prepare the individual for the practice of nursing.  Incorporating a program of learning, a variety of instructional methodologies, and available resources; nursing education fosters competency, accountability and continued professional development.  Learning is a life long process which promotes professionalism and is beneficial for the learner and society.

 

 

Organizing Framework

  •  The schematic diagram presented below is designed to show the complete picture of the program of learning.  The description of the schematic drawing of The Alabama College System nursing programs is as follows:
  • The umbrella represents a diagrammatic scheme of the nursing programs’ organizing framework.  In order for an umbrella to function properly, it must be unfurled, have all its parts connected and its fabric intact.  The nursing faculty visualize the organizing framework in a similar manner. The philosophy serves as the handle of the umbrella and is used to unfurl the curriculum.  The organizing framework is composed of four major concepts:  nursing, nursing process, human needs and the health-illness continuum.  These four concepts are depicted by the horizontal bands on the umbrella. The eleven ribs of the umbrella represent the eleven curriculum threads. These threads are based on the philosophy and the four major concepts and connect the fabric of the curriculum to the pinnacle of the umbrella which represents the program outcomes.

 umbrella

 

Program Outcomes

  • Performance on Licensure Exam—The licensure exam pass rate will be at or above the national mean for first-time writers.
  •  Program Completion—At least 75% of the students admitted will graduate within 150% of the time of the stated program length beginning with the first required nursing course as delineated below: 
    • Associate degree nursing--eight semesters
    • LPN-RN mobility option with NUR 200--six semesters
    • LPN-RN mobility option without NUR 200--five semesters
    • Paramedic -RN mobility option--five semesters
    • Practical nursing--five semesters
    • Part-time practical nursing and associate degree nursing options-one and one half times the semester length of the respective program
  • Program Satisfaction—At least 80% of graduates responding to the graduate survey distributed within one year after graduation will indicate satisfaction with the program.
    • At least 80% of employers responding to the employer survey distributed within one year after graduation will indicate satisfaction with the program.
  •  Job Placement- At least 90% of the graduates seeking employment will be employed one year after graduation in a position for which the program prepared them.