Campuses

 

Ayers Campus

1801 Coleman Rd, Anniston, AL 36202

(256) 835-5400 

Harry M. Ayers State Technical College, named for the long-time editor of the Anniston Star newspaper, was initially founded as the Harry M. Ayers State Trade School by an act of the Alabama Legislature on May 3, 1963. In 1972, the institution was designated as a technical college that offered students associate's degree and certificate programs in such fields as accounting, automotive body repair, carpentry, childcare, computer and information science, cosmetology, general drafting, electrical, medical laboratory technician, practical nursing, surgical/operating room technician, and welding technology. To eliminate duplication of courses, the consolidation of Gadsden State Community College and the Harry M. Ayers State Technical College was completed on July 8, 2003. It is now called the Ayers Campus of Gadsden State Community College.

 

Cherokee Center Campus

801 Cedar Bluff Rd, Centre, AL 35960

(256) 927-1800

In August 2002, Gadsden State opened the Cherokee County Instructional Site in response to community and governmental efforts to meet the growing educational needs in the region. Evening courses offered included computer science, mathematics, biology, fine arts, humanities, and social sciences. The site was relocated in August 2008 to a multi-level complex that offers an expanded list of courses for students wishing to earn an associate's degree and transfer to a four-year institution. Gadsden State Cherokee houses an Economic Development Center that enables Gadsden State to partner with local communities to promote community, workforce, and economic development. In addition, the Center has a multipurpose 2,500-seat arena, a 300-seat conference room, and additional smaller meeting rooms. The complex also hosts some offices of the Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce.

 

East Broad Campus

401 Korner St. Gadsden, AL 35903

(256) 549-8300

One of the initial founding institutions of Gadsden State and the oldest of the institutions, Alabama Technical College was established in 1925 as the Alabama School of Trades and was the first state-operated trade school in the southern United States. When it opened, instruction in four trades was offered—brick masonry, carpentry, electrical, and printing. Students helped government workmen lay the bricks to build the school’s first permanent two-story buildings. In 1941, the school had an enrollment of approximately 200 students from 44 counties throughout the state and several from out-of-state. In 1973, it became Alabama Technical College and after the merger was renamed the East Broad Campus of Gadsden State Community College.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Valley Street Campus

600 Valley Street Gadsden 35901

(256)  549-8670

Gadsden State Technical Institute began in 1960 as Gadsden Vocational Trade School, a private vocational training school for African Americans. It was founded by Eugene N. Prater, director of the Veterans General Continuation Program for Negroes, in response to discontent expressed by black veterans of Etowah County for being denied admission to the all-white Alabama School of Trades. The new school was approved by the Veterans Administration for training under the G.I. Bill and began to enroll black veterans. By August 1961, enrollment was at 71, and course offerings included auto mechanics and repair, plastering and cement finishing, brick masonry, woodworking, dry cleaning and laundry, general business, and tailoring. The school was identified as part of the state's network of vocational/technical schools and appointed Prater as the director. In 1962, the state of Alabama assumed ownership of the school, and in 1972, it was renamed Gadsden State Technical Institute. The U.S. Department of Education designated this institution as a Historically Black College or University (HBCU) in 1997. The facility now serves as the Valley Street Campus of Gadsden State.

 

Wallace Drive Campus

1001 George Wallace Drive Gadsden 35903

(256) 549-8200

Gadsden State Junior College was established in 1965 by an act of the State Legislature during the administration of Governor George C. Wallace. During the first fall term, under President Allan D. Naylor, the school admitted 740 full-time freshmen and employed 36 faculty members and administrators and 14 other staff. At this time, the school had two main buildings, the James B. Allen Administration and Browder Hall Science Buildings. The course offerings included professional programs such as architecture, business administration, dentistry, engineering, home economics, journalism, law, medicine, music, science, social work, and teacher education. Technical programs offered included architectural technology, data processing technology, engineering technology, management and supervision technology, medical secretary, nursing education, and secretarial science. In addition to the programs offered in regular day classes, night classes were offered in 18 fields of study. Gadsden State Junior College served students from 12 counties and four states. It is currently identified as the Wallace Drive Campus of Gadsden State Community College.